My Children

Anger is simmering along side Felicie Boucher’s passionate fascination of family roots. Touring France with Georgette, the self-proclaimed family historian she hears of yet another war memorial.

“Felicie, your great grandfather Philippe Boucher’s memorial is there, second column twenty-fifth name from the top.”

104 years earlier Philippe never saw the adrenaline charged 30 centimeter bayonet find it’s mark, twist, withdraw, and with purpose find the next enemy belly just meters away.

Inherited tears begin to fall and Felicie exclaims, “Where was God? What had Him so busy during all that carnage?”

“I was in My place, receiving My children.”

  • 100 words

Written for the weekly Friday Fictioneers hosted by our gracious host Rochelle Wisoff – Fields. This week’s PHOTO PROMPT © Sandra Crook. Read other takes and enter your own here

17 thoughts on “My Children”

    1. Thanks Rochelle. I was glad the photo was high resolution. I had to magnify it so I could see the building details. That’s when the story started coming to me. You are right,,,,, it is a common question.

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  1. “I was in My place, receiving My children.”
    Yes. But.
    Doesn’t it go an awful lot further than that? Among other things, war is where we see hell at its plainest; presumably, God is also at his most active there as well? As, indeed, we should be, by opposing war and institutionalised violence of all sorts, whenever, and wherever. Don’t you think?
    But you only had a 100 words, and you wrote a good story with an apposite conclusion, so well done!

    Liked by 1 person

  2. I often wonder where God is during war but then you need to wonder who’s God and where that God might be. And then I think it’s not God’s problem. He gave us brains, why do we use our brawn instead? Thanks for making me re-wonder all that with your well-scribed 100-words.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Thank you for the kind words Alicia. You bring up some great wonderments. What’s important to know is that God loves you more than imaginable, and you have the free will to . . . .

      Liked by 1 person

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